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Research Papers

Design and Analysis of a Novel Integrated Wind-Solar-OTEC Energy System for Producing Hydrogen, Electricity, and Fresh Water

[+] Author and Article Information
Haris Ishaq

Clean Energy Research Laboratory,
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: haris.ishaq@uoit.net

Osamah Siddiqui

Clean Energy Research Laboratory,
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: osamah.siddiqui@uoit.net

Ibrahim Dincer

Clean Energy Research Laboratory,
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science,
University of Ontario Institute of Technology,
2000 Simcoe Street North,
Oshawa, ON, L1H 7K4, Canada
e-mail: ibrahim.dincer@uoit.ca

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Solar Energy Engineering: Including Wind Energy and Building Energy Conservation. Manuscript received January 4, 2019; final manuscript received June 2, 2019; published online June 28, 2019. Assoc. Editor: M. Keith Sharp.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 141(6), 061015 (Jun 28, 2019) (13 pages) Paper No: SOL-19-1006; doi: 10.1115/1.4044023 History: Received January 04, 2019; Accepted June 10, 2019

A new energy system for power, hydrogen and fresh water production is proposed. The environmentally benign ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), wind and solar energy resources are utilized. The hybrid thermochemical CuCl cycle is used for hydrogen production, and the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination system is incorporated for producing fresh water. The presently developed system is analyzed through thermodynamic energy and exergy approaches. The energetic efficiency of the integrated trigeneration system is determined to be 45.3%, and the exergetic efficiency is found to be 44.9%. In addition to this, the energy efficiency of the OTEC power generation cycle is 4.5% while the exergy efficiency is found to be 12.9%. Furthermore, the CuCl hydrogen production cycle is examined to have exergetic and energetic efficiencies of 36% and 35.2%, respectively. Also, numerous parametric studies are performed to analyze the system performance at different operating parameters.

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References

Dincer, I., and Acar, C., 2018, “Smart Energy Solutions With Hydrogen Options,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 43(18), pp. 8579–8599. [CrossRef]
Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EN.ATM.CO2E.PC
Acar, C., and Dincer, I., 2014, “Comparative Assessment of Hydrogen Production Methods From Renewable and Non-Renewable Sources,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 3(9), pp. 1–12. [CrossRef]
Islam, S., Dincer, I., and Yilbas, S., 2018, “Development, Analysis and Assessment of Solar Energy-Based Multigeneration System With Thermoelectric Generator,” Energy Convers. Manage., 156, pp. 746–747. [CrossRef]
Ishaq, H., Dincer, I., and Naterer, G. F., 2018, “Performance Investigation of an Integrated Wind Energy System for Co-Generation of Power and Hydrogen,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 43(19), pp. 9153–9164. [CrossRef]
Ozlu, S., and Dincer, I., 2015, “Development and Analysis of a Solar and Wind Energy Based Multigeneration System,” Sol. Energy, 122, pp. 1279–1271. [CrossRef]
Corumlu, V., Ozsoy, A., and Ozturk, M., 2018, “Thermodynamic Studies of a Novel Heat Pipe Evacuated Tube Solar Collectors Based Integrated Process for Hydrogen Production,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 43(2), pp. 1060–1070. [CrossRef]
Bai, Z., Liu, Q., Lei, J., Li, H., and Jin, H., 2015, “A Polygeneration System for the Methanol Production and the Power Generation With the Solar-Biomass Thermal Gasification,” Energy Convers. Manage., 102, pp. 190–201. [CrossRef]
Yilmaz, F., Ozturk, M., and Selbas, R., 2018, “Thermodynamic Performance Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Based Hydrogen Production and Liquefaction Process,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy 43(23), pp. 10626–10636. [CrossRef]
Ishaq, H., Dincer, I., and Naterer, G. F., 2018, “Exergy-Based Thermal Management of a Steelmaking Process Linked With a Multi-Generation Power and Desalination System,” Energy, 159, pp. 1206–1217. [CrossRef]
Al-Zareer, M., Dincer, I., and Rosen, M. A., 2017, “Development and Assessment of a New Solar Heliostat Field Based System Using a Thermochemical Water Decomposition Cycle Integrated With Hydrogen Compression,” Sol. Energy, 151, pp. 186–201. [CrossRef]
Siddiqui, O., and Dincer, I., 2018, “Examination of a New Solar-Based Integrated System for Desalination, Electricity Generation and Hydrogen Production,” Sol. Energy, 163, pp. 224–234. [CrossRef]
Ahmadi, P., Dincer, I., and Rosen, M. A., 2014, “Performance Assessment of a Novel Solar and Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Based Multigeneration System for Coastal Areas,” ASME J. Sol. Energy Eng., 137(1), p. 011013. [CrossRef]
Ahmadi, P., Dincer, I., and Rosen, M. A., 2013, “Energy and Exergy Analyses of Hydrogen Production Via Solar-Boosted Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion and PEM Electrolysis,” Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 38(4), pp. 1795–1805. [CrossRef]
Siddiqui, O., and Dincer, I., 2017, “Analysis and Performance Assessment of a New Solar-Based Multigeneration System Integrated With Ammonia Fuel Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle,” J. Power Sources, 370, pp. 138–154. [CrossRef]
Khalid, F., Dincer, I., and Rosen, M. A., 2016, “Analysis and Assessment of a Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor for Nuclear Desalination,” J. Nucl. Eng. Radiat. Sci., 2(3), p. 31014. [CrossRef]

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic layout of the proposed system integrating solar heliostat, wind turbine, and OTEC cycle

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Fig. 2

aspen plus process flow diagram of the four-step thermochemical CuCl cycle

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Fig. 3

Effect of wind speed on the wind turbine exergy destruction and power

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Fig. 4

Solar irradiance effect on the heat from solar tower and hydrogen production rate

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Fig. 5

Reference temperature effect on energy as well as exergy efficiencies of the CuCl and OTEC cycle

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Fig. 6

Effect of the flow rate of sea water on the pumps work rates

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Fig. 7

The effect of flow rate of water on the heat recovery at specific flow rates of cupric chloride

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Fig. 8

Variation in the work rates of the OTEC turbine and pump with the change in OTEC turbine inlet pressure

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Fig. 9

The effect of inlet pressure of turbine on the turbine exergy destruction and the energy as well as exergy efficiencies of the OTEC cycle

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Fig. 10

Recovery ratio effect on the energy as well as exergy efficiencies

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Fig. 11

Effect of the inlet temperature of sea water on the exergies of seawater and freshwater and the overall efficiencies

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Fig. 12

Seawater inlet temperature effect on the efficiencies of the RO unit pumps work rates

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Fig. 13

Sea water salinity effect on the energy as well as exergy efficiencies of the RO unit and overall system

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Fig. 14

Effect of freshwater salinity on the energy as well as exergy efficiencies of the RO unit and overall system

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Fig. 15

Pump efficiency effect on the energy as well as exergy efficiencies

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