0
research-article

Investigations of a Dehumidifier in a Solar Assisted Liquid Desiccant Demonstration Plant

[+] Author and Article Information
Mustafa Jaradat

Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Kassel, 34125 Kassel, Germany
jaradat@uni-kassel.de

Daniel Fleig

Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Kassel, 34125 Kassel, Germany
daniel.fleig@uni-kassel.de

Klaus Vajen

Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Kassel, 34125 Kassel, Germany
vajen@uni-kassel.de

Ulrike Jordan

Institute of Thermal Engineering, University of Kassel, 34125 Kassel, Germany
jordan@uni-kassel.de

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040841 History: Received June 28, 2017; Revised May 27, 2018

Abstract

A solar-assisted liquid desiccant demonstration plant was built and experimentally evaluated. Humidity of the air, density of the desiccant and all relevant mass flows and temperatures were measured at each inlet and outlet position. Adiabatic dehumidification experiments were performed in different seasons of the year under various ambient air conditions. The moisture removal rate m ?_v, the mass balance factor ?_m, and the absorber effectiveness, e_abs, were evaluated. An aqueous solution of LiCl was used as liquid desiccant with an initial mass fraction of about 0.4 kgLiCl/kgsol. The mass flow rate of the air was about 1100 kg/h. The experimental results showed a reduction in the air humidity ratio in the range of 1.3 to 4.3 g/kg accompanied with an increase in the air temperature in the range of 3 to 8.5 K, depending on the inlet and operating conditions. A maximum mass fraction spread of 5.7 % points due to dilution in the desiccant and a volumetric energy storage capacity of 430 MJ/m3 were achieved for an air to desiccant mass flow ratio of 82. By operating the desiccant pump in an intermittent mode, a mass fraction spread of about 13 % points and an energy storage capacity of about 900 MJ/m3 were reached. In addition, the experimental results were compared with results from a numerical model. The numerical model overestimates the heat and mass transfer because it assumes ideal surface wetting and uniform distribution of the circulated fluids.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In