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Research Papers

Optimal V-Reflector Design With Maximum Solar Concentration

[+] Author and Article Information
Rabi Ibrahim Rabady

Department of Electrical Engineering,
Jordan University of Science and Technology,
P.O. Box 3030,
Irbid 22110, Jordan
e-mail: rabirabady@yahoo.com

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING: INCLUDING WIND ENERGY AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSERVATION. Manuscript received January 26, 2016; final manuscript received March 1, 2017; published online March 21, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Mary Jane Hale.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 139(3), 031010 (Mar 21, 2017) (4 pages) Paper No: SOL-16-1053; doi: 10.1115/1.4036179 History: Received January 26, 2016; Revised March 01, 2017

For low-concentration solar applications, v-reflectors are attractive choice to collect sunlight since they are simple to build with reduced manufacturing cost and technical requirements. In this paper, with the account for the power evolution of all possible reflection modes, careful modeling for the concentration ratio of such collectors was achieved and optimized by numerical methods in order to determine the optimal apex-angle that facilitates maximum utilization of the solar energy. The outcome of this research is interesting since it provides a useful recipe for an optimal design of v-reflectors that can be found in various solar applications.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Reflection modes and angels relation for V-trough concentrator

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Fig. 2

Resulted optimal half-apex-angle versus the normalized reflector length for stainless steel, aluminum, and silver reflectors

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Fig. 3

Corresponding maximum concentration ratio versus the normalized reflector length for stainless steel, aluminum, and silver reflectors

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Fig. 4

(a) Optimal half-apex-angle versus the normalized reflector length with corresponding fourth-order polynomial fit (dashed line). (b) Maximum concentration ratio versus the normalized reflector length with logarithmic fit (dashed line) for stainless steel reflector. (c) Maximum concentration ratio versus the normalized reflector length with logarithmic fit (dashed line) for aluminum reflector. (d) Maximum concentration ratio versus the normalized reflector length with logarithmic fit (dashed line) for silver reflector.

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