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Research Papers

Phase Change Material For Solar Thermal Energy Storage In Buildings: Numerical Study

[+] Author and Article Information
Zineb Bouhssine

Laboratory of Physical Materials,
Microelectronics, Automatics and
Heat Transfer (LPMMAT),
Faculty of Sciences,
Hassan II University of Casablanca-Morocco,
Casablanca 20600, Morocco
e-mail: zineb.bouh@gmail.com

Mostafa Najam

Laboratory of Physical Materials,
Microelectronics, Automatics and
Heat Transfer (LPMMAT),
Faculty of Sciences,
Hassan II University of Casablanca-Morocco,
Casablanca 20600, Morocco
e-mail: mnejam@yahoo.fr

Mustapha El Alami

Laboratory of Physical Materials,
Microelectronics, Automatics and
Heat Transfer (LPMMAT),
Faculty of Sciences,
Hassan II University of Casablanca-Morocco,
Casablanca 20600, Morocco
e-mails: m.elalami@fsac.ac.ma;
elalamimus@gmail.com

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING: INCLUDING WIND ENERGY AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSERVATION. Manuscript received April 26, 2016; final manuscript received August 9, 2016; published online September 15, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Jorge E. Gonzalez.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 138(6), 061006 (Sep 15, 2016) (8 pages) Paper No: SOL-16-1192; doi: 10.1115/1.4034518 History: Received April 26, 2016; Revised August 09, 2016

Thermal storage plays a major role in a wide variety of industrial, commercial, and residential applications when there is a mismatch between the offer and the claim of energy. In this paper, we study numerically the contribution of phase change materials (PCMs) for solar thermal energy storage (TES) in buildings. The studied configuration is a plane solar collector incorporating a PCM layer and coupled to a concrete slab (a roof of a building). The study is conducted for Casablanca (Morocco) meteorological conditions. Several simulations were performed to optimize the melting temperature and the PCM layer thickness. The results show that PCM imposes, on the roof, a temperature close to its melting temperature. The choice of a melting temperature Tmelt = 22 °C (the local indoor temperature Tc is fixed as Tc = 22 °C) limits the losses through the concrete slab, considerably. This last seems to be, nearly, adiabatic, in this case. Also, the energy released by PCM solidification, overnight, increases the outlet temperature of the coolant fluid to 35 °C and the useful flux to 80 W/m2, increasing the efficiency of the solar collector by night. The PCM functioned both as an energy storage material for the stabilization of the coolant fluid temperature and as an insulating material for the building.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Studied configuration

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Fig. 2

Climatic conditions of Casablanca, January 2013

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Fig. 3

Variation of the melting front position as a function of time

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Fig. 4

Indoor temperature variation with time

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Fig. 5

Variation of Tin with time for different values of Tmelt

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Fig. 6

Variation of the liquid fraction with time for different values of Tmelt

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Fig. 7

Variation of Tfo as a function of the PCM melting temperature

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Fig. 8

Variation of the useful flux as a function of the PCM melting temperature

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Fig. 9

Variation of Tin with time for different values of the thickness of the PCM, Tmelt = 22 °C

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Fig. 10

Variation of the liquid fraction with time for different values of the thickness of the PCM, Tmelt = 22 °C

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Fig. 11

Variation of the outlet temperature of the fluid as a function of the thickness of the PCM, Tmelt = 22 °C

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Fig. 12

Variation of the useful flux as a function of the thickness of the PCM, Tmelt = 22 °C

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Fig. 13

(a) Variation of the internal temperature and the liquid fraction as a function of time. (b) Variation of the efficiency of the solar collector as a function of time.

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