0
Research Papers

Effects of Partition on Thermal Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, Energy Consumption, and Perception in Air-Conditioned Buildings

[+] Author and Article Information
Pradip Aryal

School of Manufacturing Systems and
Mechanical Engineering,
Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology,
Thammasat University,
P.O. Box 22, Thammasat Rangsit Post Office,
Pathum Thani 12121, Thailand
e-mail: prad.aryal@gmail.com

Thananchai Leephakpreeda

School of Manufacturing Systems and
Mechanical Engineering,
Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology,
Thammasat University,
P.O. Box 22, Thammasat Rangsit Post Office,
Pathum Thani 12121, Thailand
e-mail: thanan@siit.tu.ac.th

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING: INCLUDING WIND ENERGY AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSERVATION. Manuscript received March 9, 2016; final manuscript received June 19, 2016; published online July 25, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Jorge E. Gonzalez.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 138(5), 051005 (Jul 25, 2016) (11 pages) Paper No: SOL-16-1122; doi: 10.1115/1.4034072 History: Received March 09, 2016; Revised June 19, 2016

This research is to assess effects of a partition on thermal comfort, indoor air quality (IAQ), energy consumption, and perception in an air-conditioned space via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The variables of indoor air are numerically determined before/after installation/removal of a partition. Accordingly, predicted mean vote (PMV) of thermal comfort, carbon dioxide concentration, rate of energy consumption in making up air, and an overall perception index are proposed to quantify effects in a partitioned space. For a case study, a partition is used to tightly separate a study area from a rest area in a library during peak time. The CFD analysis is performed so that the mean differences between the measured and simulated variables at 14 locations are less than 5%. After partitioning in the CFD analysis, it is found that the average PMV value decreases to −1.4 in the rest area, and it remains at −0.7 in the study area where occupants perceive a slightly cool sensation. In the study area, the carbon dioxide concentration increases to 450–500 ppm, while the rate of energy consumption increases by 8.3%. From the overall perception index of 0.9, the occupants feel spacious in the partitioned areas. Therefore, installing the partition is encouraged with the recommendation that cooling supply can be reduced for energy savings. It is apparent that the proposed methodology yields quantitative indicators for decision making of installation/removal of partitions. The interior investigation of partitions in buildings can be performed before making real physical changes.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2016 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Three-dimensional model of library space

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Locations of supply diffusers, extract grilles, measurement points, and occupants

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Making up indoor air of HVAC system

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Hall's personal space

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Perception index at various locations of partition: (a) Ip=1, (b) 0<Ip<1, and (c) Ip=0

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Perception index against distance of partition

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Comparisons of simulated results with measurement data: (a) air temperature, (b) relative humidity, (c) air velocity, and (d) carbon dioxide concentration

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Comparison of PMV distribution: (a) without partition and (b) with partition

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Comparison of carbon dioxide distribution: (a) without partition and (b) with partition

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Comparison of perception: (a) without partition and (b) with partition

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In