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Research Papers

Technoeconomic Analysis of Alternative Solarized s-CO2 Brayton Cycle Configurations

[+] Author and Article Information
Clifford K. Ho

Sandia National Laboratories,
Albuquerque 87185-1127, NM
e-mail: ckho@sandia.gov

Matthew Carlson

Sandia National Laboratories,
Albuquerque 87185-1127, NM

Pardeep Garg, Pramod Kumar

Indian Institute of Science,
Bangalore 560012, India

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING: INCLUDING WIND ENERGY AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSERVATION. Manuscript received September 18, 2015; final manuscript received March 22, 2016; published online July 12, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Carlos F. M. Coimbra.The United States Government retains, and by accepting the article for publication, the publisher acknowledges that the United States Government retains, a nonexclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, worldwide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this work, or allow others to do so, for United States government purposes.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 138(5), 051008 (Jul 12, 2016) (9 pages) Paper No: SOL-15-1313; doi: 10.1115/1.4033573 History: Received September 18, 2015; Revised March 22, 2016

This paper evaluates cost and performance tradeoffs of alternative supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) closed-loop Brayton cycle configurations with a concentrated solar heat source. Alternative s-CO2 power cycle configurations include simple, recompression, cascaded, and partial cooling cycles. Results show that the simple closed-loop Brayton cycle yielded the lowest power-block component costs while allowing variable temperature differentials across the s-CO2 heating source, depending on the level of recuperation. Lower temperature differentials led to higher sensible storage costs, but cycle configurations with lower temperature differentials (higher recuperation) yielded higher cycle efficiencies and lower solar collector and receiver costs. The cycles with higher efficiencies (simple recuperated, recompression, and partial cooling) yielded the lowest overall solar and power-block component costs for a prescribed power output.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of a solar-driven, indirectly heated, closed-loop supercritical CO2 Brayton power cycle

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Fig. 2

A flow diagram of a SCBC configuration

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Fig. 3

A flow diagram of a supercritical CO2 RCBC

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Fig. 4

A flow diagram of the first CCBC analyzed by Kimzey[23]

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Fig. 5

Schematic of a CBI cycle [24]

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Fig. 6

T–s diagram of CBI cycle [24]

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Fig. 7

CBI cycle efficiency versus turbine inlet pressure for various turbine outlet pressures. Legend: ◻ p4 = 10 bar, Δ p4 = 15 bar, ○ p4 = 20 bar, × p4 = 26 bar, ⋄ p4 = 75 bar. (1bar = 100 kPa).

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Fig. 8

Heat exchanger material selection curves from the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel code

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Fig. 9

Thermal-to-electric efficiency of various s-CO2 closed Brayton cycle configurations as a function of temperature difference across the primary heat source to the power block (ΔTHTR)

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Fig. 10

Mass flow rate of heat-transfer/storage media and required thermal input as a function of temperature difference across the heat source to the power block (ΔTHTR)

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Fig. 11

Heliostat cost as a function of thermal-to-electric efficiency

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Fig. 12

Receiver cost as a function of thermal-to-electric efficiency

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Fig. 13

Thermal storage cost as a function of temperature difference across the heat source to the power block (ΔTHTR)

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