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Research Papers

Optical Analysis of a Two Stage XX Concentrator for Parametric Trough Primary and Tubular Absorber With Application in Solar Thermal Energy Trough Power Plants

[+] Author and Article Information
Juan Pablo Núnez Bootello

Abengoa,
Calle Energía Solar, 1,
Seville 41014, Spain
e-mail: jp.nunez@abengoa.com

Henry Price

Abengoa,
1250 Simms Street,
Lakewood, CO 80401
e-mail: hank.price@abengoa.com

Manuel Silva Pérez

Group of Thermodynamics
and Renewable Energy,
Department of Energy Engineering,
University of Seville,
Seville 41004, Spain
e-mail: msilva@us.es

Manuel Doblaré Castellano

Abengoa,
Calle Energía Solar, 1,
Seville 41014, Spain
e-mail: manuel.doblare@abengoa.com

Manuscript received November 18, 2015; final manuscript received February 24, 2016; published online April 5, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Mary Jane Hale.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 138(4), 041002 (Apr 05, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: SOL-15-1392; doi: 10.1115/1.4032944 History: Received November 18, 2015; Revised February 24, 2016

A new symmetric nonimaging parametric trough collector (PmTC) for an evacuated circular receiver is proposed having an absorber diameter of 70 mm similar to the LS3/Eurotrough absorber one, and a circular secondary. The optical design method is explained and a sensitivity analysis is conducted with respect to the diameter of the secondary and to the acceptance angle. In the design process, transmission, absorption, and reflection losses are neglected. A secondary mirror radius of 145 mm and an acceptance angle of ±14 mrad were chosen as realistic values. For these values a concentrator geometry having 8.7 m gross aperture and 100% intercept factor for rays impinging on the primary within the referred acceptance angle is obtained producing a net concentration ratio relative to the thermodynamic ideal limit of 0.52 compared to 0.31 for traditional parabolic trough collectors. The new concentrator is composed of a primary discontinuous reflector with two symmetrical portions with parametric geometry, and a central parabolic portion located between the other two. The ensemble secondary receiver can be dressed up with the secondary concentrator manufactured by partially mirroring a diameter adapted glass tube—either internally or externally—or alternatively by means of a commercial evacuated receiver and an independent 145 mm radius arc of circumference external secondary reflector. Monte Carlo ray-tracing results show that only 15% of the rays undergo secondary reflection before arriving to the absorber and a sharp angle transmission curve. The new concentrator is proposed for application in solar thermal energy (STE) trough power plants.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Macrofocal parabola reflecting one set of edge rays tangentially to the receiver [3]

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Fig. 2

Cross section of the helmet concentrator proposed by Miñano and coworkers [5]

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Fig. 3

Proposed PmTC geometry compared to the LS3/Eurotroughparabola

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Fig. 4

PmTC design method explanation (not at scale)

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Fig. 5

Dependency of the net aperture and the ratio C/Cmax with the glass tube radius and the half angle of acceptance for a fixed receiver radius of 35 mm

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Fig. 6

Angle transmission curve comparison

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Fig. 7

Ray-tracing results of collimated beams having incidence angles of 0.7 deg and 0.1 deg

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Fig. 8

Secondary concentrator manufactured by partially mirroring the glass tube

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Fig. 9

External secondary concentrator and commercial evacuated receiver

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