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Research Papers

A New Generation of Medium Temperature Collector for Solar Cooling1

[+] Author and Article Information
Roland Winston

School of Engineering,
University of California, Merced,
Merced, CA 95343
e-mail: rwinston@ucmerced.edu

Lun Jiang

School of Engineering,
University of California, Merced,
Merced, CA 95343
e-mail: ljiang2@ucmerced.edu

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING: INCLUDING WIND ENERGY AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSERVATION. Manuscript received June 22, 2013; final manuscript received June 23, 2015; published online July 23, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Gilles Flamant.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 137(5), 051006 (Jul 23, 2015) (5 pages) Paper No: SOL-13-1176; doi: 10.1115/1.4030928 History: Received June 22, 2013

Prologue

In the early 1970s, I began a research effort at Argonne National Laboratory to develop the nonimaging nontracking solar concentrator I had recently invented which became known as the compound parabolic concentrator or CPC. I had lots of help; in particular from lab director, Robert G. Sachs 1, Gale Pewitt, William Schertz, and many others. The lab recruited some of the best scientists in the world, in the relevant fields to work with me: for optics, Walter Welford, and for solar energy, Frank Kreith. Our first project was solar domestic hot water (DHW) for the “Breadsprings elementary school” in a Navajo Indian reservation near Gallup, NM. The collector was a threefold concentration nonevacuated CPC. Because threefold concentration can only accept solar motions for half the year, it was oriented for winter. Like every other project I ever collaborated on with Frank Kreith, it was a big success. I thought it was fitting to submit a paper on a recent “CPC” for much higher temperature (200 °C), totally stationary, and driving a double-effect absorption chiller.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

XCPC design rendering

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Fig. 3

XCPC efficiency curve according to T* = (Tin − Tamb)/G

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Fig. 4

XCPC angular acceptance

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Fig. 5

August 22, 2012—Typical system performance

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Fig. 6

August 21, 2012—System performance under cloudy conditions

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Fig. 7

August 21, 2012—System performance under cloudy conditions

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Fig. 8

August 15, 2012—System performance with dirty collectors

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Fig. 9

August 15, 2012—System performance with dirty collectors

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Fig. 10

August 20, 2012—System performance with clean collectors

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Fig. 11

August 20, 2012—System performance with clean collectors

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