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Research Papers

Stress and Fracture Analyses of Solar Silicon Wafers During Suction Process and Handling

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Saffar

Department of Structural Engineering,
Norwegian University of Science and Technology,
Trondheim 7491, Norway

S. Gouttebroze

SINTEF Materials and Chemistry,
Oslo 0314, Norway

Z. L. Zhang

Department of Structural Engineering,
Norwegian University of Science and Technology,
Trondheim 0314, Norway

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING: INCLUDING WIND ENERGY AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSERVATION. Manuscript received February 11, 2014; final manuscript received November 24, 2014; published online January 8, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Santiago Silvestre.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 137(3), 031010 (Jun 01, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: SOL-14-1060; doi: 10.1115/1.4029451 History: Received February 11, 2014; Revised November 24, 2014; Online January 08, 2015

Solar wafer/cell breakage depends on the combination of the stresses generated in the handling and the presence of structural defects such as cracks. Suction process is a common loading during silicon wafer handling. This paper presents a systematic static and dynamic analysis of the suction process. Optimum suction pad diameter and locations are obtained by minimizing the stress distribution under both static and dynamic loading, and the effect of the impact time on the crack driving force is also investigated in this optimum situation. The results show that the four pads configuration with diameter of 20 mm placed in a rhombus shape with 18 and 38 mm diagonal lengths yields lowest maximum principle stress among the cases analyzed. In the dynamic fracture analyses, the maximum J integral appears at 800 and 1400 μs for continued holding and unloading cases after reaching the maximum load, respectively. The J integral for the unloading cases are always smaller than the holding cases. It has been found that when the impact time is longer than 3 s and 5600 μs the dynamic fracture mechanics analysis of the suction impact process can be replaced by a static fracture mechanics analysis for the holding and unloading cases, respectively.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Load and boundary conditions for (a) a static and (b) a dynamic model

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Fig. 2

Finite element mesh of the cracked model

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Fig. 3

Maximum principle stress distributions for different pad numbers for (a) static and (b) dynamic analyses

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Fig. 4

The effect of pad number on the maximum principle stress

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Fig. 5

Schematic plot of loading versus support and pad diameter

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Fig. 6

The effect of distance between the pads on the maximum principle stress

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Fig. 7

Schematic plot of the effect of pad distance on wafer stress distribution

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Fig. 8

The effect of pad distance in y axis on the stress distribution for the case with two pads fixed in x axis

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Fig. 9

Typical stress distribution around the crack tip

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Fig. 10

Types of loading after reaching the maximum load

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Fig. 11

The variation of normalized J integral versus time for the holding case (the load is held after the maximum impact load)

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Fig. 12

The variation of normalized J integral versus time for the unloading case (the load is removed after the maximum impact load)

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Fig. 13

Maximum normalized J integral versus impact time: comparison between the loading and unloading cases

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