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Research Papers

TRNSYS Modeling of a Linear Fresnel Concentrating Collector for Solar Cooling and Hot Water Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
Tanzeen Sultana

School of Mechanical &
Manufacturing Engineering,
University of New South Wales,
Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia
e-mail: tanzeen.s@unswalumni.com

Graham L. Morrison

School of Mechanical
& Manufacturing Engineering,
University of New South Wales,
Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia
e-mail: g.morrison@unsw.edu.au

Robert Taylor

School of Mechanical
& Manufacturing Engineering,
University of New South Wales,
Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia
e-mail: robert.taylor@unsw.edu.au

Gary Rosengarten

School of Aerospace,
Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering,
RMIT University,
Carlton, VIC 3053, Australia
e-mail: gary.rosengarten@rmit.edu.au

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING: INCLUDING WIND ENERGY AND BUILDING ENERGY CONSERVATION. Manuscript received October 28, 2013; final manuscript received October 9, 2014; published online November 7, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Werner Platzer.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 137(2), 021014 (Apr 01, 2015) (9 pages) Paper No: SOL-13-1329; doi: 10.1115/1.4028868 History: Received October 28, 2013; Revised October 09, 2014; Online November 07, 2014

In this paper, simulation of a linear Fresnel rooftop mounted concentrating solar collector is presented. The system is modeled with the transient system (trnsys) simulation program using the typical meteorological year file containing the weather parameters of four different cities in Australia. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to determine the heat transfer mechanism in the microconcentrating (MCT) collector. Ray trace simulations using soltrace (NREL) were used to determine optical efficiency. Heat loss characteristics determined from CFD simulation were utilized in trnsys to assess the annual performance of the solar cooling system using an MCT collector. The effect of the different loads on the system performance was investigated, and from trnsys simulations, we found that the MCT collector achieves a minimum 60% energy saving for both domestic hot water usage and high temperature solar cooling and hot water applications.

Copyright © 2015 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Exploded view of a solar microconcentrator system and (b) cross-section of the MCT collector

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Fig. 2

Solar total power absorbed as a function transverse angles (longitudinal incidence angle zero degree)

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Fig. 3

Front view of solar tracing at 0 deg incidence angle (a) showing geometric configuration losses and (b) zoomed view of blocking losses between adjacent mirrors

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Fig. 4

Optical efficiency as a function of transverse angle

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Fig. 5

Optical losses as a function of transverse angle

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Fig. 6

IAM curve for MCT collector

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Fig. 7

Absorber heat loss as a function of temperature

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Fig. 8

Schematic of a trnsys model for an MCT domestic hot water system

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Fig. 9

Monthly energy delivered by the MCT collector of domestic hot water systems, collector inclination = 20 deg in Sydney [25]

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Fig. 10

Monthly energy flows by combined solar cooling and hot water system

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Fig. 11

Schematic of a trnsys model for MCT high temperature cooling system

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Fig. 12

Effect of primary tank size on the auxiliary power required by the system (collector area = 220 m2) in Sydney

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Fig. 13

Effect of primary tank size on the energy delivered by the MCT collector

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Fig. 14

Effect of hot water tank size on the energy delivered by the MCT collector

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Fig. 15

Energy savings as a function of primary tank size

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Fig. 16

Energy savings as a function of hot water tank size

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Fig. 17

Effect of the collector area on the gas required by the system in Sydney (collector slope = 20 deg)

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Fig.18

Effect of the collector area on the solar heat gained by the system in Sydney (collector slope = 20 deg)

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Fig. 19

Energy saving versus collector gross area

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Fig. 20

Effect of collector slope angle on solar heat gain by the MCT (collector area = 220 m2)

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Fig. 21

Energy saving performance versus various collector slopes area

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Fig. 22

Solar radiation for different cities

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Fig. 23

Energy delivered by the MCT for different cities with peak winter hot water load of 1000 MJ/day and cooling load of 100 kW

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