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Research Papers

Modeling of an Indirect Solar Assisted Heat Pump System for a High Performance Residential House

[+] Author and Article Information
Jenny Chu

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Carleton University,
Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada
e-mail: jenny.chu@carleton.ca

Wilkie Choi

Department of Mechanical
and Materials Engineering,
Queen's University,
Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
e-mail: choiwilkie@gmail.com

Cynthia A. Cruickshank

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
Carleton University,
Ottawa, ON K1S 5B6, Canada
e-mail: cynthia.cruickshank@carleton.ca

Stephen J. Harrison

Department of Mechanical
and Materials Engineering,
Queen's University,
Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
e-mail: harrison@me.queensu.ca

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING. Manuscript received September 19, 2013; final manuscript received April 11, 2014; published online May 13, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Werner Platzer.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 136(4), 041003 (May 13, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: SOL-13-1263; doi: 10.1115/1.4027486 History: Received September 19, 2013; Revised April 11, 2014

The combination of solar thermal and heat pump systems as a single solar assisted heat pump (SAHP) system can significantly reduce residential energy consumption in Canada. As a part of Team Ontario's efforts to develop a high performance house for the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon 2013 Competition, an integrated mechanical system (IMS) consisting of a SAHP was investigated. The system was designed to provide domestic hot water (DHW), space-heating, space-cooling, and dehumidification. The system included a cold and a hot thermal storage tanks and a heat pump to move energy from the low temperature reservoir to the hot reservoir. Solar thermal collectors supplied heat to the cold storage and operated at a higher efficiency due to the heat pump reducing the temperature of the collector working fluid. The combination of the heat pump and solar thermal collectors allows more heat to be harvested at a lower temperature, and then boosted to a suitable temperature for domestic use via the heat pump. The IMS and the building's energy loads were modeled using the TRNSYS simulation software. A parametric study was conducted to optimize the control, sizing, and configuration of the system. The simulation results suggested that the investigated system can achieve a free energy ratio (FER) of about 0.583 for the high performance house designed for the Ottawa climate.

Copyright © 2014 by ASME
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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Indirect solar assisted heat pump system [11]

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Fig. 2

Schematic of SAHP system

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Fig. 3

Graphical interface of the TRNSYS model of the system

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Fig. 5

Monthly loads for the base model

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Fig. 6

Change in temperature of the house throughout a year

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Fig. 7

Change in relative humidity of the house throughout the year

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Fig. 8

Parametric study of various parameters of the system

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Fig. 9

FER achieved by varying the heat pump inlet temperature conditions

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Fig. 10

The system performance with varying tank sizes

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Fig. 11

FER achieved by varying flat plate and evacuated tube collector array sizes

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Fig. 12

FER achieved by varying the auxiliary heater height and inlet node heights within the hot tank

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Fig. 13

FER achieved by varying the node height for heating coil return (using Type 534 for the hot tank)

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Fig. 14

FER achieved by varying the ERV effectiveness

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Fig. 15

Monthly load distribution of the recommended system

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