0
Research Papers

Investigation on Operating Processes for a New Solar Cooling Cogeneration Plant

[+] Author and Article Information
R. Shankar

CO2 Research and Green Technologies Centre,
Energy Division School of Mechanical
and Building Sciences,
VIT University,
Vellore 632 014, Tamil Nadu, India

T. Srinivas

CO2 Research and Green Technologies Centre,
Energy Division School of Mechanical
and Building Sciences,
VIT University,
Vellore 632 014, Tamil Nadu, India
e-mail: srinivastpalli@yahoo.co.in

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Solar Energy Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF SOLAR ENERGY ENGINEERING. Manuscript received January 31, 2013; final manuscript received March 30, 2014; published online May 2, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Werner Platzer.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 136(3), 031016 (May 02, 2014) (10 pages) Paper No: SOL-13-1034; doi: 10.1115/1.4027423 History: Received January 31, 2013; Revised March 30, 2014

Some commercial units and industries need more amount of cooling than the power such as cold storage, shopping complex, etc. In this work, a new cooling cogeneration cycle (Srinivas cycle) has been proposed and solved to generate more cooling with adequate power generation from single source of heat at hot climatic conditions with ammonia–water mixture as a working fluid. The operational processes conditions for the proposed cooling cogeneration plant are different compared to the power-only (Kalina cycle system) system and cooling-only (vapor absorption refrigeration) system. This work focused to generate the optimum working conditions by parametric analysis from thermodynamic point of view. An increase in cycle maximum temperature is only supporting the power generation but not the cooling output. Cooling output is also 15 times more than power generation. So, it has been recommended to operate the integrated plant with low temperature heat recovery. The resulted cycle thermal efficiency, plant thermal efficiency, specific power, specific cooling, cycle power efficiency, cycle coefficient of performance (COP), and solar collector's specific area are 27%, 10%, 15 kW, 220 kW, 1.8%, 0.25, and 10 m2/kW, respectively.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2014 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Srinivas, T., Reddy, B. V., and Gupta, A. V. S. S. K. S., 2011, “Biomass Fueled Integrated Power and Refrigeration System,” Proc. Inst. Mech. Eng., Part A, 225(3), pp. 249–258. [CrossRef]
Tamm, G., Goswami, D. Y., Lu, S., and Hasan, A. A., 2003, “Novel Combined Power and Cooling Thermodynamic Cycle for Low Temperature Heat Sources, Part 1: Theoretical Investigation,” ASME J. Sol. Energy Eng., 125(2), pp. 218–222. [CrossRef]
Tamm, G., and Goswami, D. Y., 2003, “Novel Combined Power and Cooling Thermodynamic Cycle for Low Temperature Heat Sources, Part 2: Experimental Investigation,” ASME J. Sol. Energy Eng., 125(2), pp. 223–229. [CrossRef]
Tamm, G., Goswami, D. Y., Lu, S., and Hasan, A. A., 2004, “Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of a Ammonia–Water Power and Refrigeration Thermodynamic Cycle,” Sol. Energy, 76(1–3), pp. 217–228. [CrossRef]
Kalina, I. A., 1984, “Combined Cycle System With Novel Bottoming Cycle,” ASME J. Eng. Gas Turbine Power, 106(4), pp. 737–742. [CrossRef]
Tyagi, K. P., 1988, “Design Parameters of an Aqua-Ammonia Vapor Absorption Refrigeration System,” Heat Recovery Syst. CHP, 8(4), pp. 375–377. [CrossRef]
Horuza, I., and Callander, T. M. S., 2004, “Experimental Investigation of a Vapor Absorption Refrigeration System,” Int. J. Refrig., 27(1), pp. 10–16. [CrossRef]
Fernandez Seara, J., Vales, A., and Vazquez, M., 1998, “Heat Recovery System to Power an Onboard NH3-H2O Absorption Refrigeration Plant in Trawler Chiller Fishing Vessels,” Appl. Therm. Eng., 18(12), pp. 1189–1205. [CrossRef]
Deng, J., Wang, R. Z., and Han, G. Y., 2011, “A Review of Thermally Activated Cooling Technologies for Combined Cooling, Heating and Power Systems,” Prog. Energy Combust. Sci., 37(2), pp.172–203. [CrossRef]
DeVault, B., 2005, “Integrated Energy Systems Cooling, Heating & Power Overview,” Oak Ridge National Laboratory, http://energetics.com/depeerreview05/pdfs/presentations/enduse/eu2_a2-pdf
Garland, P. W., 2003, “CHP for Buildings Integration: Test Centers at ORNL and University of Maryland,” Oak Ridge National Laboratory, http://www.ornl.gov/sci/eere/PDFs/garland_seminar.pdf
Zheng, D., Chen, B., Qi, Y., and Jin, H., 2006, “Thermodynamic Analysis of a Novel Absorption Power/Cooling Combined Cycle,” Appl. Energy, 83(4), pp. 311–323. [CrossRef]
Wang, J., Dai, Y., and Gao, L., 2008, “Parametric Analysis and Optimization for a Combined Power and Refrigeration Cycle,” Appl. Energy, 85(11), pp. 1071–1085. [CrossRef]
Wang, J., Dai, Y., Zhang, T., and Ma, S., 2009, “Parametric Analysis for a New Combined Power and Ejector–Absorption Refrigeration Cycle,” Energy, 34(10), pp. 1587–1593. [CrossRef]
Srinivas, T., and Reddy, B. V., 2014, “Thermal Optimization of a Solar Thermal Cooling Cogeneration Plant at Low Temperature Heat Recovery,” ASME J. Energy Resour. Technol., 136(2), pp. 1–10. [CrossRef]
Zare, V., Mahmoudi, S. M. S., and Yari, M., 2012, “Ammonia Water Cogeneration Cycle for Utilizing Waste Heat From the GT-MHR Plant,” Appl. Therm. Eng., 48(15), pp.176–185. [CrossRef]
Ziegler, B., and Trepp, C., 1984, “Equation of State for Ammonia–Water Mixtures,” Int. J. Refrig., 7(2), pp. 101–106. [CrossRef]
Shankar Ganesh, N., and Srinivas, T., 2013, “Processes Assessment in Binary Mixture Plant,” Int. J. Energy Environ., 4(1), pp. 321–330.
Valan Arasu, A., and Sornakumar, T., 2007, “Design, Manufacture and Testing of Fiberglass Reinforced Parabola Trough for Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors,” Sol. Energy, 81(10), pp. 1273–1279. [CrossRef]
Nag, P. K., 2005, Engineering Thermodynamics, 3rd ed., Tata McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, India.
Lu, S., and Goswami, D. Y., 2003, “Optimization of a Combined Power/Refrigeration Thermodynamic Cycle,” ASME J. Sol. Energy Eng.125(2), pp. 212–217. [CrossRef]
Pouraghaie, M., Atashkari, K., Besarati, S. M., and Nariman-zadeh, N., 2010, “Thermodynamic Performance Optimization of a Combined Power/Cooling Cycle,” Energy Conserv. Manage., 51(5), pp. 204–211. [CrossRef]
Shankar Ganesh, N., and Srinivas, T., 2013, “Thermodynamic Assessment of Heat Source Arrangements in Kalina Power Station,” ASCE J. Energy Eng., 139(2), pp. 1–10. [CrossRef]
Vijayaraghavan, S., and Goswami, D. Y., 2006, “A Combined Power and Cooling Cycle Modified to Improve Resource Utilization Efficiency Using a Distillation Stage,” Energy, 31(8–9), pp. 1177–1196. [CrossRef]
Shankar Ganesh, N., and Srinivas, T., 2012, “Design and Modeling of Low Temperature Solar Thermal Power Station,” Appl. Energy, 91(1), pp. 180–186. [CrossRef]

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic arrangement of cooling cogeneration plant; THR, throttle valve; MIX, mixer

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) Enthalpy–concentration and (b) temperature–entropy diagram for the cooling cogeneration cycle shown in Fig. 1

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Plant pressure variations with separator vapor fraction and generator temperature at the turbine concentration of 0.9

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Plant performance variations with vapor fraction and its temperature on (a) cycle thermal efficiency–specific power; (b) plant thermal efficiency–cooling effect; (c) cycle power efficiency–cycle COP; and (d) total output–solar collector's area at the turbine concentration of 0.9

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Plant pressure variations with separator vapor fraction and turbine ammonia concentration at the separator temperature of 150 °C

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Plant performance variations with vapor fraction and turbine concentration on (a) cycle thermal efficiency–specific power; (b) plant thermal efficiency–cooling effect; (c) cycle power efficiency–cycle COP; and (d) total output–solar collector's area at the separator temperature of 150 °C

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Plant performance variations with vapor fraction and circulating cooling water inlet temperature on (a) cycle thermal efficiency–specific power; (b) plant thermal efficiency–cooling effect; (c) cycle power efficiency–cycle COP; and (d) total output–solar collector's area

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Comparison of exergetic losses in compound cycle components/processes; ABS, absorber; CDP, condensate pump; CND, condenser; DM, dephlegmator; EVP, evaporator; HEX, heat exchanger; HRVG, heat recovery vapor generator; MIX, mixer; SEP, separator; THR, throttling

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In