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Research Papers

Optimization of Solar Photovoltaic Fields

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Weinstock

Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel

J. Appelbaum

Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israelappel@eng.tau.ac.il

J. Sol. Energy Eng 131(3), 031003 (Jun 10, 2009) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3142705 History: Received August 30, 2008; Revised January 11, 2009; Published June 10, 2009

The design of stationary and single axes tracking collectors in a field consisting of rows of collectors involves relationships between the field and collector parameters and solar radiation data. In addition, shading and masking of adjacent rows affect the collector deployment of the field by decreasing the incident energy on the collector plane. The use of many rows, densely deployed in a given field, increases the field incident energy but also increases the shading. Therefore, there is an optimal deployment of the collectors in the field yielding, for example, maximum energy, minimum required field area, or other objectives. For photovoltaic collectors, the output energy depends on the module efficiency, the solar cell operating temperature, and on the scheme of the electrically interconnected modules. Series interconnection between the photovoltaic modules may have a significant effect on the output energy of the solar plant in event of shading. The present article deals with the optimal design of photovoltaic solar fields for stationary and single axes tracking collectors to obtain maximum annual output energy.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Shading by collectors in a stationary solar field

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Figure 2

Shadow variation Hs=f(Ls) and shaded area (gray) on December 21, for stationary collectors

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Figure 3

Illumination/shading times of modules in the morning hours on December 21

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Figure 4

North-south horizontal axis: east-west tracking collectors

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Figure 5

Shadow variation Hs=f(Ls) and shaded area (gray) on December 21 for east-west tracking collector

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Figure 6

East-west horizontal axis: north-south tracking collectors

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Figure 7

Shadow variation Hs=f(Ls) and shaded area (gray) on December 21 for a north-south tracking collector

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Figure 8

PV module with two bypass diodes

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Figure 9

Percentage output power of series connected modules as a function of percentage of shaded modules in the string

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