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Research Papers

Comparative Study of Photocatalytic Degradation Mechanisms of Pyrimethanil, Triadimenol, and Resorcinol

[+] Author and Article Information
J. Araña1

Fotocatálisis y Electroquímica Aplicada al Medio-Ambiente (FEAM), Unidad Asociada al Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC, CIDIA (Depto. de Química), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Edificio del Parque Científico Tecnológico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, 35017, Las Palmas, Spainjaranaesp@hotmail.com

C. Fernández Rodríguez, J. A. Herrera Melián, O. González Díaz, J. Pérez Peña

Fotocatálisis y Electroquímica Aplicada al Medio-Ambiente (FEAM), Unidad Asociada al Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC, CIDIA (Depto. de Química), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Edificio del Parque Científico Tecnológico, Campus Universitario de Tafira, 35017, Las Palmas, Spain

1

Corresponding author.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 130(4), 041002 (Sep 04, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2969793 History: Received November 13, 2007; Revised November 26, 2007; Published September 04, 2008

The photocatalytic degradation of an endocrine disruptor (resorcinol) and of two fungicides (pyrimethanil and triadimenol) has been studied and compared. The effect of pH, oxygen, and H2O2 on the photocatalytic degradation of these compounds has been established. The three organics were analyzed by means of high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and their mineralization by total organic concentration (TOC) measurements. The evolution of the toxicity to Lemna minor of the aqueous solutions of the three organics during their photocatalytic treatment has also been studied. The obtained results have been interpreted according to Fourier transform infrared studies on the interaction of the molecules with the catalyst surface and their reaction mechanisms by gas chromatographpy-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. The toxicity studies have shown that some intermediates acted as nutrients or toxicity antagonists as negative growth rate inhibitions were obtained. After 30min of reaction, the resorcinol and pyrimethanil solutions were detoxified, although some amount of the organics still remained. In the case of triadimenol, a 92% detoxification was achieved after 60min of reaction. The solar photocatalytic degradations of the pollutants have resulted to be comparable with those obtained with UV lamp. The obtained results suggest that the type of interaction of pyrimethanil and triadimenol with the TiO2 surface decides their degradation mechanism by which the effect of pH, H2O2, and dissolved oxygen is determined. It has also been confirmed that the photocatalytic techniques are very efficient at the detoxification of wastewaters contaminated with these fungicides.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Adsorbed mass (shaded) and degradation rate constants of resorcinol at different pH in the presence of oxygen (white), without oxygen (black)

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Figure 2

Adsorbed mass (shaded) and degradation rate constants of pyrimethanil at different pH in the presence of oxygen (white), without oxygen (black)

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Figure 3

Adsorbed mass (shaded) and degradation rate constant of triadimenol at different pH in the presence of oxygen (white), without oxygen (black)

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Figure 4

Photocatalytic degradation rate constants of resorcinol with UV lamp and solar light, with oxygen (white), without oxygen (black), in the presence of H2O2 (shaded) and in the presence of H2O2 without TiO2 (striped)

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Figure 5

Photocatalytic degradation rate constants of pyrimethanil with solar and UV lamp, with oxygen (white), without oxygen (black), in the presence of H2O2 (shaded) and in the presence of H2O2 without TiO2 (striped)

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Figure 6

Comparison between solar and UV lamp photocatalytic degradation of triadimenol: degradation rate constants with oxygen (white), without oxygen (black), in the presence of H2O2 (shaded) and in the presence of H2O2 without TiO2 (striped)

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Figure 7

Lemna minor dose-response toxicity curve for resorcinol (▲), pyrimethanil (●), and triadimenol (◼)

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Figure 8

Evolution of toxicity (a), degradation (b), and mineralization (c) of resorcinol (▲), pyrimethanil (●), and triadimenol (◼) during their photocatalytic degradations (pH 5)

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Figure 9

FTIR spectra of pyrimethanil (a) and pyrimethanil+TiO2 (b)

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Figure 10

FTIR spectra of triadimenol (a) and triadimenol+TiO2 (b)

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