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Research Papers

Effects of Particle Size and Substrate Surface Properties on Deposition Dynamics of Inkjet-Printed Colloidal Drops for Printable Photovoltaics Fabrication

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Biswas, S. Gawande, V. Bromberg

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY 13902

Y. Sun1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Binghamton University, Binghamton, NY 13902; Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104ysun@coe.drexel.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 132(2), 021010 (May 10, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001470 History: Received September 03, 2009; Revised December 11, 2009; Published May 10, 2010; Online May 10, 2010

Using fluorescence microscopy, the inkjet deposition dynamics of monodispersed polystyrene particles in the size range of 0.021.1μm have been studied on glass, Ar plasma cleaned glass, and PDMS coated glass substrates. The results show that the substrate properties play an important role in determining the final dried patterns formed by the colloidal particles. Our observations also reveal that particle size and contact angle formed by the solvent in the dispersion determine how close to the contact line the particles can be deposited. It is found that smaller particles can move closer to the deposited contact line than particles with bigger sizes. This study can serve as a realistic experimental model system for a number of fundamental queries on how the final deposition microstructure depends on the ink formulation and substrate properties. The knowledge obtained here can be explored further to optimize process parameters for the fabrication of hybrid solar cells with improved morphology and device properties.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

The ink jet setup

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Figure 2

Sequence of frames recorded after the impact of a jetted drop containing 1.1 μm particles on an Ar plasma treated glass substrate, (a) just after the impact, t=0 s, (b) t=0.28 s, when the contact line diameter reaches its maxima (c) t=0.70 s, and (d) t=1.20 s, when the drop is completely dried. The pre-impact in-flight diameter and velocity of the drop were 50 μm and 1.2 m/s.

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Figure 3

The change in contact line and particle deposition diameters with the evaporation of two similar drops, containing 1.1 μm particles on an Ar plasma treated glass substrate (filled squares: drop 1 and hollow squares: drop 2)

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Figure 4

The change in contact line and particle deposition diameters with the evaporation of a drop containing 1.1 μm particle suspensions on clean glass substrates

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Figure 5

Schematic representation of the wedge shaped edge of the deposited drop

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Figure 6

The measured values of x during evaporation of the two drops in Fig. 3

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Figure 7

The values of x measured during evaporation of the drop on clean glass substrate in Fig. 4

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Figure 8

The variation in contact line diameter with the evaporation of deposited droplets of the three different colloidal suspensions on PDMS coated glass substrates

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Figure 9

Average diameter of the deposited dried drops of different particle suspensions on clean glass, Ar plasma treated, and PDMS coated glass substrates

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Figure 10

Microscopic images of inkjet deposited dried droplets of aqueous suspensions of polystyrene particles on (a) Ar treated glass, (b) clean glass, and (c) PDMS coated glass substrates. Each row, from left to right, shows a particle size of 0.02 μm, 0.2 μm, and 1.1 μm, respectively. The red dashed circles show the maximum diameter position of the contact line with the substrate.

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Figure 11

AFM images of (a) clean glass, (b) Ar plasma treated, and (c) PDMS coated glass samples

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Figure 12

The variation in contact line diameter with the evaporation of a deposited droplet containing 0.2 μm particles on Ar plasma treated and clean glass substrates

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Figure 13

The variation in contact line diameter with the evaporation of a deposited droplet containing 0.02 μm particles on Ar plasma treated and clean glass substrates

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