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Research Papers

Solar Water Disinfection Studies With Supported TiO2 and Polymer-Supported Ru(II) Sensitizer in a Compound Parabolic Collector

[+] Author and Article Information
Juan Rodríguez

Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, P.O. Box 31-139, Lima 31, Perú; Universidad de Tarapacá, Avenue General Velásquez No. 1775, Arica, Chile

Clido Jorge, Patricia Zúñiga, Silvia Ponce, Walter Estrada

Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, P.O. Box 31-139, Lima 31, Perú

Javier Palomino, Pedro Zanabria

 Centro de Capacitación para el Desarrollo (CECADE), Urbanización COVIDUC H-16 San Sebastián, Cusco, Perú, Cusco 84, Perú

José L. Solís

Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, P.O. Box 31-139, Avenue Tupac Amaru 210, Lima 31 Peru; Instituto Peruano de Energía Nuclear, Avenue Canadá 1470, Lima, Perú

J. Sol. Energy Eng 132(1), 011001 (Nov 09, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000328 History: Received October 11, 2007; Revised March 19, 2009; Published November 09, 2009

Solar water disinfection was performed using TiO2 and a Ru(II) complex as fixed catalysts located in a compound parabolic collector photoreactor. Studies were performed in the laboratory as well as at a greenfield site. Under laboratory conditions, natural water contaminated with cultured bacteria was photocatalytically treated and the influence of the photolysis as well as of both catalysts was studied. Experiments were performed with contaminated water flowing at 12 l/min; under these conditions, photocatalytic experiments performed with a supported heterogeneous photocatalyst (Ahlstrom paper impregnated with TiO2) showed it to be effective in degrading bacteria in water. The Ru complex catalyst, however, showed no clear evidence for disinfecting water, and its efficiency was comparable to the simple photolysis. Under on-site experiments, bacteria contaminated water from the Yaurisque river at Cusco, Peru was treated. As a general trend, after photocatalytic treatment a reduction in the E-coli population present in water was observed. Whenever disinfection was achieved in the experiments, no regrowth of bacteria was observed after 24 h. However, a reduction in the prototype efficiency was observed both in laboratory and on-site experiments. This was ascribed to aging of the photocatalyst as well as due to the deposition of particles onto its surface. In cases in which incomplete disinfection resulted, a low rate of E-coli growth was observed 24 h after ending the experiment. However, pseudomones seem to be resistant to the treatment.

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Figures

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Figure 2

E-coli concentration as a function of UV-A integrated energy received by the CPC type photocatalytic reactor (Fig. 1): results for TiO2 (first use), Ru complex (second use), and photolysis are presented

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Figure 3

E-coli concentration as a function of integrated UV-A received energy by the CPC type photocatalytic reactor (Fig. 1): results for TiO2 (first, sixth, and ninth uses)

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Figure 4

Micrographs of the Ahlstrom NW1047 catalyst: (a) before use, (b) after the seventh batch, and (c) after the 18th batch. Pictures on the right show close-ups of the fibers composing the catalyst. Pictures on the left are close-ups of the interstitial part between the fibers that form the catalysts.

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Figure 5

Micrographs of the photosensitizer strip, Ru complex: (a) before use and (b) after the fourth batch

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Figure 6

Integrated energy calculated from the measured solar global radiation in Yaurisque. The term “experiment” in the plot refers to a run of one-day duration.

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Figure 7

E-coli concentration degradation with the photocatalytic reactor. In the plot, a one-day run is referred to as “experiment.” Experiments were performed using water from the Yaurisque River contaminated with bacteria.

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Figure 8

(a) Aeruginose and (b) SPP pseudomone concentrations in a long term catalyst use for bacteria degradation. The one-day run is referred to as “experiment” in the plot. Experiments were performed using water from the Yaurisque River contaminated with bacteria.

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Figure 1

Scheme of the laboratory reactor. The inset shows a cross section of the irradiation system

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