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Research Papers

Impact of Layered Soil on Foundation Heat Transfer for Slab-On Grade Floors

[+] Author and Article Information
Nizar Khaled, Khaled Rouissi

 Ecole Polytechnique de Tunisie, P.O. Box 743,La Marsa 2078, Tunisia

Moncef Krarti

Civil, Environmental and Architectural Department,  University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309

J. Sol. Energy Eng 134(2), 021007 (Mar 06, 2012) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005623 History: Received June 26, 2010; Revised July 26, 2011; Published March 01, 2012; Online March 06, 2012

This paper presents an analytical solution associated with the steady-periodic heat transfer for a typical slab-on-grade floor building foundation in contact with a nonhomogeneous soil medium. In particular, the solution accounts for the impact of the above-grade wall thickness on the ground-coupled heat transfer. The interzone temperature estimation profile (ITPE) technique is utilized to obtain the analytical solution to determine soil temperature distributions and to estimate foundation heat loss/gain from slab-on-grade floors. In this paper, the impact of the nonhomogeneous soil properties on the transient foundation heat transfer is investigated for various slab configurations and soil thermal properties. The presented solution presents the first ITPE analytical solution for building foundation coupled with layered soil medium. The results indicate that nonhomogeneous soil properties have a significant effect on soil temperature distribution and on total slab heat loss. In particular, it is found that an error of up to 20% in estimating total slab heat transfer can be incurred if homogeneous soil medium is considered instead of a two-layered ground.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figure 1

Multilayered soil of slab-on-grade floor building foundation

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Figure 2

(a) Total indoor conduction/convection flux versus number of terms N (case of two layers). (b) Heat normalized error versus number of terms N (case of two layers).

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Figure 3

(a) Isotherms during winter (Jan. 15 with To  = 5.34 °C). (b) Isotherms during spring (Apr. 15 with To  = 17.58 °C). (c) Isotherms during summer (Jul. 15 with To = 24.65 °C). (d) Isotherms during fall (Oct. 15 with To = 12.44 °C).

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Figure 4

(a) Isotherms during winter (Jan. 15 with To  = 5.34 °C). (b) Isotherms during spring (Apr. 15 with To  = 17.58 °C). 4(c) Isotherms during summer (Jul. 15 with To  = 24.65 °C). (d) Isotherms during fall (Oct. 15 with To  = 12.44 °C).

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Figure 5

(a) Indoor heat flux distribution along the slab surface during winter (Jan. 15). (b) Indoor heat flux distribution along the slab surface during summer (Jul. 15).

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Figure 6

The annual variation of the total heat loss

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Figure 7

Impact of wall thickness on building foundation heat transfer

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