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RESEARCH PAPERS

Gas Temperature Measurements in High Concentration Solar Furnace Environments: Evidence of Nonequilibrium Effects

[+] Author and Article Information
J. M. Badie, L. Cassan, B. Granier

 PROMES-CNRS, 7 rue du Four Solaire, 66120 Odeillo, France

S. Agudelo Florez

 Universidad de Antioquia, Apartado Aéreo 1226, Medellín, Colombia

F. Chejne Janna

 Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Apartado Aéreo 1027, Sede Medellín, Colombia

J. Sol. Energy Eng 129(4), 412-415 (Mar 20, 2007) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2769718 History: Received March 20, 2006; Revised March 20, 2007

Temperature measurements of the gas phase surrounding the hot front during material processing at the focus of a high concentration solar furnace can be achieved by coupled emission and absorption optical spectroscopy. The emitted light results from a fluorescence phenomenon of some vapor species from the heated sample excited by absorption of the incident concentrated beam. Absorption measurements were performed on these same species with a reference beam using the sun radiation as source. These coupled techniques led to consistent results and suggested the existence of a nonequilibrium Knudsen layer near the vaporizing surface. In this paper, we report measurements performed on YO diatomic molecule issuing from a melted sample of yttrium oxide.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Experimental setup. Lens L1 collects the light from the fluorescence plume to be analyzed by the spectrometer via optical fiber F1. Lens L2 forms an image of the sun (direct beam from the heliostat) on the entrance end of optical fiber F2. At the other end of F2, the lens L3 provides a reference beam for absorption measurements. Absorption measurements use also L1 and F1.

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Figure 2

Picture of a melted Y2O3 sample showing the fluorescence plume. The coexistence of liquid and solid phases assure that the surface temperature is near the melting temperature of the oxide (2710K).

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Figure 3

Vibrational and rotational temperatures measured by emission spectroscopy versus distance above a sample melted in argon (50hPa). The line is the result of FLUENT calculations.

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Figure 4

Vibrational and rotational temperatures measured by emission spectroscopy versus distance above a sample melted in argon (1hPa). The line is the result of FLUENT calculations.

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Figure 5

Crude absorption spectrum of AΠ2→X∑+2 band spectra of YO molecule showing also absorption line (Na) of solar spectrum

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Figure 6

Absorption spectrum of AΠ2→X∑+2 band spectra of YO molecule after treatment

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Figure 7

Evolution of YO vibrational and rotational temperatures near the surface (d=0.1mm) as function of argon pressure measured by coupled absorption and by emission spectroscopy on the YO system A3∕2

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