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RESEARCH PAPERS

Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Gas-Particle Flow Within a Solid-Particle Solar Receiver

[+] Author and Article Information
Huajun Chen, Yitung Chen, Hsuan-Tsung Hsieh

Department of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154

Nathan Siegel

Solar Technologies Department, MS 0753,  Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185

J. Sol. Energy Eng 129(2), 160-170 (Aug 25, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2716418 History: Received July 21, 2006; Revised August 25, 2006

A detailed three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on gas-particle flow and heat transfer inside a solid-particle solar receiver, which utilizes free-falling particles for direct absorption of concentrated solar radiation, is presented. The two-way coupled Euler-Lagrange method is implemented and includes the exchange of heat and momentum between the gas phase and solid particles. A two-band discrete ordinate method is included to investigate radiation heat transfer within the particle cloud and between the cloud and the internal surfaces of the receiver. The direct illumination energy source that results from incident solar radiation was predicted by a solar load model using a solar ray-tracing algorithm. Two kinds of solid-particle receivers, each having a different exit condition for the solid particles, are modeled to evaluate the thermal performance of the receiver. Parametric studies, where the particle size and mass flow rate are varied, are made to determine the optimal operating conditions. The results also include detailed information for the gas velocity, temperature, particle solid volume fraction, particle outlet temperature, and cavity efficiency.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic illustration of aerodynamic and thermal processes in a solid-particle receiver

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Figure 2

Benchmark study on a freely falling curtain of particles, where the particle size is 650μm and particle density is 3130kg∕m3, particle heat capacity is 1255J∕kgK. Two particle mass flow rates with 0.04kg∕s (high mass flow rate case) and 0.02kg∕s (low mass flow rate case) are considered. The initial particle temperatures are 603K and 703K, respectively.

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Figure 3

Solid-particle receiver (in meters) for the experimental and CFD study

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Figure 4

Airflow pattern for the case (a) with bottom outlet and (b) without bottom outlet. The particle size is 600μm and particle mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s.

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Figure 5

Velocity magnitude (m∕s) contours for the case (a) with bottom outlet and (b) without bottom outlet. The particle size is 600μm and particle mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s.

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Figure 6

Air isotherms (in degrees Kelvin) for the case (a) with bottom outlet and (b) without bottom outlet. The particle size is 600μm and particle mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s.

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Figure 7

Entrained airflow path lines released from inlet and back flow path lines released from outlet on the side wall. The path line is colored by gas temperature (in degrees Kelvin). Particle size is 600μm. The mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s.

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Figure 8

Particle tracks released from inlet on the top wall for different particle size: (a) 600μm, and (b) 200μm. The path tracks are colored by particle temperature (in degrees Kelvin). Total 400 particles are tracked. The mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s.

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Figure 9

Particle distribution on the bottom plane. Particle size is 600μm. The mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s.

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Figure 10

Particle temperature on the bottom plane. Particle size is 600μm. The mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s.

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Figure 11

Particle volume fraction as a function of distance from back wall at different height in select slice (X=1m) H is the distance from the bottom wall. Particle size is 600μm. Mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s.

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Figure 12

Particle (a) vertical velocity and (b) particle temperature as a function of distance from top wall in select slice (X=1m). Particle size is 600μm. The mass flow rate is 1.5kg∕s. Particle ID is 200.

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Figure 13

Cavity efficiency as a function of (a) particle size and (b) particle mass flow rate

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Figure 14

Particle outlet temperature as a function of (a) particle size and (b) particle mass flow rate

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