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RESEARCH PAPERS

Solar Photocatalytic Decontamination of Phenol Using Pyrolytic TiO2 Films Deposited Inside Glass Tubing

[+] Author and Article Information
José Diaz

Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, P.O. Box 31-139, Av., Tupac Amaru 210, Lima, Perú

Juan Rodríguez, José Solís, Walter Estrada

Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, P.O. Box 31-139, Av., Tupac Amaru 210, Lima Perú and Instituto Peruano de Energía Nuclear, Av. Canadá 1470, Lima, Perú

Silvia Ponce

Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, P.O. Box 31-139, Av., Tupac Amaru 210, Lima Perú

J. Sol. Energy Eng 129(1), 94-99 (Jun 22, 2006) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2391265 History: Received July 15, 2005; Revised June 22, 2006

Solar photocatalytic degradation of phenol was performed using TiO2 films deposited inside glass tubing by a spray-gel technique. Photocatalytic phenol degradation experiments were performed using either solar radiation or a 300W lamp simulating the UVA solar radiation component. In order to concentrate the radiation a reflective surface was placed in the rear part of the tube. The obtained TiO2 films were amorphous, but after annealing at 450°C for 1h, the films crystallized to the anatase structure and presented photocatalytic activity. The films’ morphology, observed by scanning electron microscopy, presented a uniform film and agglomerates of TiO2. The size of the agglomerates increases as Ti isopropoxide/ethanol molar ratio of the starting solution increases. The concentration of the precursor solution and the film thickness of TiO2 was optimized for phenol degradation. The TiO2 film obtained with a Ti-isopropoxide/ethanol molar ratio of 0.0259 and a film thickness between 1.2to2.4μm were shown to yield the highest phenol degradation.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Spray pyrolysis system for coating the inside of a glass tube

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Figure 2

Irradiation scheme of the (a) TiO2 coated glass tube filled with aqueous phenol solution (20ppm), and (b) with a volume limiter

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Figure 3

X-ray diffraction pattern for TiO2 film deposited inside glass tubing after annealing at 450°C for 1h

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Figure 4

SEM micrographs of annealed TiO2 films obtained from solutions with a Ti isopropoxide/ethanol molar ratio of (a) 0.0066, (b) 0.0193, and (c) 0.0259

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Figure 5

SEM micrographs of the cross section of two typical Ti oxide films obtained from solutions with Ti isopropoxide/ethanol molar ratio of 0.026 with (a) four and (b) ten layers

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Figure 6

Phenol photodegradation as a function of film thickness: (a) 400 and (b) 200mL, for TiO2 coated tubing obtained with Ti isopropoxide/ethanol molar ratio of (∎) 0.0066, (엯) 0.0193, and (▴) 0.0259

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Figure 7

Phenol relative concentration as a function of the time. Photocatalytic degradation of 200ppm phenol in water solution were performed during four days. START and STOP means under solar illumination and in the dark, respectively.

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Figure 8

Spectral transmittance for TiO2 films obtained from solutions with a Ti isopropoxide/ethanol molar ratio of 0.0259 and having the thickness shown; uncovered glass tube

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Figure 9

UV-A transmittance for TiO2 films deposited with a Ti isopropoxide/ethanol molar ratio of 0.026 as a function of the number of identical interfaces through which the radiation must pass

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Figure 10

UV-A transmittance as a function of TiO2 films thickness deposited with Ti isopropoxide/ethanol molar ratio of 0.0259 measured inside (▴) and outside (∎) the tubing. The full and dotted lines are fitted and calculated, respectively.

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