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RESEARCH PAPERS

RuNiMgO Catalyzed SiC-Foam Absorber for Solar Reforming Receiver-Reactor

[+] Author and Article Information
Tatsuya Kodama

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Niigata University, 8050 Ikarashi 2-nocho, Niigata 950-2181, Japantkodama@eng.niigata-u.ac.jp

Takuya Moriyama, Takehiro Shimoyama, Nobuyuki Gokon

Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, 8050 Ikarashi 2-nocho, Niigata 950-2181, Japan

Hidemasa Andou

Technical Department, Krosakiharima Corporation, 1-1 Higashihamamachi, Yawatanishi-ku, Kitakyusyu 806-8586, Japan

Nobuhiro Satou

Fine Ceramics Division, Krosakiharima Corporation, 1-1 Higashihamamachi, Yawatanishi-ku, Kitakyusyu 806-8586, Japan

J. Sol. Energy Eng 128(3), 318-325 (Apr 08, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2210497 History: Received April 07, 2005; Revised April 08, 2005

High-temperature solar reforming of methane with CO2 is investigated using a directly solar-irradiated absorber subjected to a solar mean flux level above 400kWm2 (the peak flux of about 700kWm2). The new type of catalytically activated ceramic foam absorber—a RuNiMgO catalyzed SiC-foam absorber—was prepared, and its activity was tested in a laboratory-scale volumetric receiver-reactor with a transparent (quartz) window by using a sun-simulator. Compared to conventional RhAl2O3 catalyzed SiC-foam absorber, this new catalytic absorber is more cost effective and is found to exhibit a superior reaction performance at the high solar flux or at high temperatures, especially above 950°C. This new absorber will be applied in solar receiver-reactor systems for converting concentrated high solar fluxes to chemical fuels via endothermic natural-gas reforming at high temperatures.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of experimental setup for activity test under solar simulated visible light irradiation.

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Figure 2

Time variation of chemically-absorbed power density (Pd) between the alumina absorbers activated with Ni–Mg–O (solid circles) (sample 1) and Rh∕γ-Al2O3 (open triangles) (sample 2) for the CO2 reforming under solar-simulated visible light irradiation. The MFD of the irradiation was 380kW∕m2 and the PFD was 570kW∕m2. The GHSV of the CH4–CO2 mixture was 2.5×104h−1. The cell number of the absorbers was 20 cpi.

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Figure 3

(a) Original SiC foam, (b) Ni–Mg–O-activated SiC foam, and (c) Ru∕Ni–Mg–O-activated SiC foam (sample 5). The cell number of the foams was 11 cpi.

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Figure 4

Effects of ruthenium loading of SiC absorber activated with Ru∕Ni–Mg–O on CO2-reforming activity under the infrared light irradiation at the constant absorber temperature of 950°C. Symbols: Solid squares are for 1.2wt.%, open circles for 0.8wt.% and open triangles for 0.44wt.% of Ru loading (samples 3–5). The MgO and Ni loadings for mass of SiC foam were fixed to 4wt.% and 0.44wt.%, respectively. The cell number of the foams was 11 cpi. The GHSV was 2.5×104h−1.

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Figure 5

Time variation of methane conversion between the SiC absorbers activated with Ru∕Ni–Mg–O (solid circles) (sample 5) and Ru∕Mg–O (open triangles) (non-Ni-applied, sample 6) for CO2 reforming under the infrared light irradiation at the constant absorber temperature of 950°C. The Ru and MgO loadings for mass of the SiC foam were fixed to 1.2wt.% and 4wt.%, respectively. The cell number of the absorbers was 11 cpi. The GHSV of the CH4–CO2 mixture was GHSV of 2.5×104h−1.

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Figure 6

Arrhenius plots for CO2 reforming with the SiC absorbers activated with Ru∕Ni–Mg–O (sample 5, solid circles) and Rh∕γ–Al2O3 (sample 7, open triangles) under the infrared light irradiation. The similar noble metal loadings were used (Ru loading was 1.2wt.% for the mass of the SiC foam and Rh loading was 1.1wt.%.). The cell number of the absorbers was 11 cpi. The GHSV of the CH4–CO2 mixture was 2.5×104h−1.

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Figure 7

Time variation of chemically absorbed power density Pd between the SiC absorbers activated with Ni–Mg–O (sample 5, solid circles) and Rh∕γ-Al2O3 (sample 7, open triangles) for CO2 reforming under irradiation by a high flux solar-simulated visible light. The MFD of the irradiation was 410kW∕m2 and PFD was 710kW∕m2. Similar noble metal loadings were used (Ru loading was 1.2wt.% for the mass of the SiC foam and Rh loading was 1.1wt.%.). The cell number of the absorbers was 11 cpi. The GHSV of the CH4–CO2 mixture was 2.5×104h−1.

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Figure 8

Chemically absorbed power density Pd as a function of mean flux density of irradiation. Symbols: Circles are for the Ru∕Ni–Mg–O-activated SiC foam (11 cpi) absorber (sample 5). Triangles are for the Rh∕γ-Al2O3-activated alumina foam absorber in the CAESAR project, estimated from data in (9).

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Figure 9

Chemical storage efficiency as a function of mean flux density of irradiation. Symbols: Circles are for the Ru∕Ni–Mg–O-activated SiC foam (11 cpi) absorber (sample 5). Triangles are for the Rh∕γ-Al2O3-activated alumina foam absorber in the CAESAR project, estimated from data in (9).

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