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RESEARCH PAPERS

An In Situ Experimental Method for the Development and Validation of Slat-Type Blind Models in Cooling Load Calculations

[+] Author and Article Information
Chanvit Chantrasrisalai

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078chanvit.chantrasrisalai10@okstate.edu

Daniel E. Fisher

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078dfisher@okstate.edu

Reference glazing for shading coefficient calculations; clear glass with nominal thickness of 3mm(18in.)

In accordance with radiative heat transfer theory (31), if the collimated light is used as a light source, then the measured reflectance is “directional-hemispherical” reflectance. If the sun and sky are the light source, then the measured reflectance is “total-hemispherical” reflectance.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 128(2), 189-198 (Aug 26, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2188530 History: Received July 29, 2005; Revised August 26, 2005

An in situ experimental procedure suitable for the development and validation of slat-type blind models used in building cooling load calculations is presented. Unique requirements of the experimental facility are presented, and measured data from the facility are compared with existing experimentally validated models. The experimental uncertainty associated with the measured solar transmittance is shown to be less than ±0.05, well within the range of accuracy required for the development of cooling load calculation procedures. The new procedure was used to validate the fenestration model in EnergyPlus, a heat balance based cooling load and energy calculation program.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Measurements of blind total solar transmittance

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Figure 2

Measurements of slat solar reflectance

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Figure 3

Calibrated slat reflectance

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Figure 4

Comparison results (Parmelee and Pfrommer Models) for 1in. vinyl white blinds: (a) downward opened (+45°), (b) horizontally opened (0°), and (c) upward opened (−40°)

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Figure 5

Comparison results (EnergyPlus Model) for 1in. vinyl white blinds: (a) downward opened (+45°), (b) horizontally opened (0°), and (c) upward opened (−40°)

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Figure 6

Curved-slat blinds (results for 1in. vinyl white blinds with slat angle of −40°)

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Figure 7

Flat-slat blinds (results for 1in. wood brown blinds with slat angle of −45°)

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Figure 8

Blinds with different colors at slat angle of +45°: (a) 1in. vinyl white blinds, (b) 1in. vinyl silver blinds, and (c) 1in. vinyl black blinds

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