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RESEARCH PAPERS

Blade Three-Dimensional Dynamic Stall Response to Wind Turbine Operating Condition

[+] Author and Article Information
S. Schreck, M. Robinson

Applied Research Division,  NREL’s National Wind Technology Center, Golden, CO 80401

J. Sol. Energy Eng 127(4), 488-495 (Jun 30, 2005) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2035706 History: Received January 25, 2005; Revised June 28, 2005; Accepted June 30, 2005

To further reduce the cost of wind energy, future turbine designs will continue to migrate toward lighter and more flexible structures. Thus, the accuracy and reliability of aerodynamic load prediction has become a primary consideration in turbine design codes. Dynamically stalled flows routinely generated during yawed operation are powerful and potentially destructive, as well as complex and difficult to model. As a prerequisite to aerodynamics model improvements, wind turbine dynamic stall must be characterized in detail and thoroughly understood. The current study analyzed turbine blade surface pressure data and local inflow data acquired by the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment during the NASA Ames wind tunnel experiment. Analyses identified and characterized two key dynamic stall processes, vortex initiation and vortex convection, across a broad parameter range. Results showed that both initiation and convection exhibited pronounced three-dimensional kinematics, which responded in systematic fashion to variations in wind speed, turbine yaw angle, and radial location.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

UAE blade twist distribution

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Figure 2

UAE blade taper distribution

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Figure 3

Blade cross section and planform, showing pressure tap locations

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Figure 4

Local inflow angle (LFA) defined with respect to blade cross section and five-hole probe

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Figure 5

Typical ensemble averaged surface pressure data. Dynamic stall vortex passage indicated by filled circular symbols.

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Figure 6

Amplitude of local inflow angle oscillation (LFAω) vs mean local inflow angle (LFAm), for U∞=9m∕s. Filled symbols indicate dynamic stall vortex presence at the pressure tap row 0.04R inboard of the five hole probe station.

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Figure 7

Amplitude of local inflow angle oscillation (LFAω) vs mean local inflow angle (LFAm), for U∞=11m∕s. Filled symbols indicate dynamic stall vortex presence at the pressure tap row 0.04R inboard of the five hole probe station.

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Figure 8

Amplitude of local inflow angle oscillation (LFAω) vs mean local inflow angle (LFAm), for U∞=13m∕s. Filled symbols indicate dynamic stall vortex presence at the pressure tap row 0.04R inboard of the five hole probe station.

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Figure 9

Amplitude of local inflow angle oscillation (LFAω) vs mean local inflow angle (LFAm), for U∞=15m∕s. Filled symbols indicate dynamic stall vortex presence at the pressure tap row 0.04R inboard of the five hole probe station.

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Figure 10

Local inflow angle at dynamic stall vortex initiation (LFAINIT)

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Figure 11

Dynamic stall vortex topologies for U∞=9, 11, 13, and 15m∕s (top to bottom), all at γ=40deg. Blade leading edge corresponds to lower boundary of planform.

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Figure 12

Dynamic stall vortex topologies for γ=20deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, and 50 deg (top to bottom), all at U∞=13m∕s. Blade leading edge corresponds to lower boundary of planform.

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