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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Optimal Solar Field Design of Stationary Collectors

[+] Author and Article Information
Dan Weinstock, Joseph Appelbaum

Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, 69978, Israel, 972-3-6409014

J. Sol. Energy Eng 126(3), 898-905 (Jul 19, 2004) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.1756137 History: Received August 01, 2003; Revised April 01, 2004; Online July 19, 2004
Copyright © 2004 by ASME
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References

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Bany,  J., and Appelbaum,  J., 1987, “The Effect of Shading on the Design of a Field of Solar Collectors,” Sol. Cells,20, pp. 201–228.
Gopinathan,  K., 1991, “Optimization of the Angle of Solar Collectors for Maximum Irradiation on Sloping Surfaces,” Int. J. Sol. Energy, 10, pp. 51–61.
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Appelbaum,  J., and Bany,  J., 1979, “Shadow Effect of Adjacent Solar Collectors in Large Scale Systems,” Sol. Energy, 23, pp. 497–508.
Jones,  R. E., and Burkhart,  J. F., 1981, “Shading Effect on Collector Rows Tilted Towards the Equator,” Sol. Energy, 26, pp. 563–565.
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Weinstock, D., and Appelbaum, J., 2003, “Deployment of Collector in an Optimal Design of Solar Fields,” ISES Solar World Congress 2003, June 14–19, Gothenburg, Sweden.
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Figures

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Shading by collectors in a solar field
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Feasible design region in a constrained optimization problem
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Feasible design region in (β-H) plane in optimization for maximum incident energy objective function. Numbers represent iso-energy lines Q in kWh, heavy lines represent the equality constraint (Eq. (6)) and inequality constraints (Eqs. (8) and (9)). The solution is marked by circle.
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Feasible design region in (K-D) plane in optimization for maximum incident energy objective function. Numbers represent iso-energy lines Q in kWh, heavy lines represent the equality constraint (Eq. (6)) and inequality constraint (Eq. (7)). The solution is marked by circle.
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Feasible design region in (L-D) plane in optimization for minimum field area objective function. Numbers represent iso-area lines in m2 and heavy lines represent the constraint (Eqs. (14) and (15) and (19) and (20)). The solution is marked by circle.
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Variation of maximum energy per unit of collector area, optimal distance between collector rows and optimal number of collector rows as a function of given amount of incident energy for a given field size of L=7.5 m, W=12 m
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Optimal number of rows and maximum yearly incident energy for different maintenance distance Dmin, for a large field (L=100 m, W=200 m, Hmax=2 m and Amax=2 m)
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Optimal inclination angle for different maintenance distance Dmin, for a large field (L=100 m, W=200 m, Hmax=2 m and Amax=2 m), maximum incident energy objective function
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Optimal number of rows and minimum field area for different maintenance distance Dmin, for a small field (Qmin=500 mWh,Hmax=2 m and Amax=2 m)
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Yearly energy increase and percent of additional collector area for different maintenance distance Dmin, for a large field (L=100 m, W=200 m, Hmax=2 m and Amax=2 m)

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