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Research Papers

A Modular Ceramic Cavity-Receiver for High-Temperature High-Concentration Solar Applications

[+] Author and Article Information
I. Hischier, P. Poživil

 Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zürich, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland

A. Steinfeld1

 Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zürich, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland;  Solar Technology Laboratory, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen, Switzerlandaldo.steinfeld@eth.ch

1

Corresponding author.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 134(1), 011004 (Nov 01, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005107 History: Received May 23, 2011; Revised September 08, 2011; Published November 01, 2011; Online November 01, 2011

A high-temperature pressurized air-based receiver is considered as a module for power generation via solar-driven gas turbines. A set of silicon carbide cavity-receivers attached to a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) are tested on a solar tower at stagnation conditions for 35 kW solar radiative power input under mean solar concentration ratios of 2000 suns and nominal temperatures up to 1600 K. A heat transfer model coupling radiation, conduction, and convection is formulated by Monte Carlo ray-tracing, finite volume, and finite element techniques, and validated in terms of experimentally measured temperatures. The model is applied to elucidate the effect of material properties, geometry, and reflective coatings on the cavity’s thermal and structural performances.

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Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 5

MC-simulated absorbed solar flux distribution on inner surface of CAV No. 2

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Figure 6

FV-simulated temperature distribution on outer surface of CAV No. 2

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Figure 7

FE-simulated principal stress distribution on outer surface of CAV No. 2

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Figure 8

Relative deviation of numerically simulated and experimentally measured temperatures on the outer surface of CAV No. 1

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Figure 9

Numerically simulated (lines) and experimentally measured temperatures by thermocouples (stars) and by IR thermography (circles) across CAV No. 1 at axial positions x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.35 m

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Figure 4

Measured temperature distribution on the outer surface of CAV No. 4. Diffusely reflecting Al2 O3 coating was applied on the inner surface for x = 0 – 0.12 m

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Figure 3

Measured temperature distribution on the outer surface of CAV No. 3

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Figure 2

Cross section of experimental setup indicating fluid (BOX, AMB) and solid (CAV, INS) zones and selected boundary heat fluxes

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Figure 1

Schematic of experimental setup consisting of cylindrical SiC cavity attached to a water-cooled secondary concentrator via an insulating ring and surrounded by a water-cooled box

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