0
Research Papers

Closed-Form Correlation of Buildings Energy Use With Key Design Parameters Calibrated Using a Genetic Algorithm

[+] Author and Article Information
Raed I. Bourisli1

Mechanical Engineering Department,  College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060, Kuwaitraed.bourisli@ku.edu.kw

Adnan A. AlAnzi

Department of Architecture,  College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060, Kuwaitadnan.aleanzi@ku.edu.kw

1

Corresponding author.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 133(4), 041005 (Oct 11, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004272 History: Received April 16, 2010; Revised March 12, 2011; Published October 11, 2011; Online October 11, 2011

This work aims at developing a closed-form correlation between key building design variables and its energy use. The results can be utilized during the initial design stages to assess the different building shapes and designs according to their expected energy use. Prototypical, 20-floor office buildings were used. The relative compactness, footprint area, projection factor, and window-to-wall ratio were changed and the resulting buildings performances were simulated. In total, 729 different office buildings were developed and simulated in order to provide the training cases for optimizing the correlation’s coefficients. Simulations were done using the VisualDOE TM software with a Typical Meteorological Year data file, Kuwait City, Kuwait. A real-coded genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize the coefficients of a proposed function that relates the energy use of a building to its four key parameters. The figure of merit was the difference in the ratio of the annual energy use of a building normalized by that of a reference building. The objective was to minimize the difference between the simulated results and the four-variable function trying to predict them. Results show that the real-coded GA was able to come up with a function that estimates the thermal performance of a proposed design with an accuracy of around 96%, based on the number of buildings tested. The goodness of fit, roughly represented by R2 , ranged from 0.950 to 0.994. In terms of the effects of the various parameters, the area was found to have the smallest role among the design parameters. It was also found that the accuracy of the function suffers the most when high window-to-wall ratios are combined with low projection factors. In such cases, the energy use develops a potential optimum compactness. The proposed function (and methodology) will be a great tool for designers to inexpensively explore a wide range of alternatives and assess them in terms of their energy use efficiency. It will also be of great use to municipality officials and building codes authors.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Overhang projection factor (PF)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.25, PF =0, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.25, PF =1, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.25, PF =2, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.50, PF =0, all

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.50, PF =1, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.50, PF =2, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.75, PF =0, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.75, PF =1, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.75, PF =2, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

E/ER versus RC, WWR =0.375, PF =2, all A

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

E/ER versus A, WWR =0.375, PF =1, many RC

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In