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Research Papers

Analysis of Solar-Thermal Power Plants With Thermal Energy Storage and Solar-Hybrid Operation Strategy

[+] Author and Article Information
Stefano Giuliano

Reiner Buck, Santiago Eguiguren

 German Aerospace Centre (DLR), Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, 70569 Stuttgart, Germanyreiner.buck@dlr.de Siemens AG, Energy Sector, Renewable Energy Division, E R STE, Hugo-Junkers-Str. 15-17, 90411 Nuremberg, Germanyreiner.buck@dlr.de

A solar field with SM1 can deliver the required design thermal power to run the power plant on nominal load at design point conditions

The solar share is the ratio of the total annual solar heat and the total annual used heat of the power plant.

J. Sol. Energy Eng 133(3), 031007 (Jul 25, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004246 History: Received January 15, 2011; Revised April 06, 2011; Published July 25, 2011; Online July 25, 2011

Selected solar-hybrid power plants for operation in base-load as well as midload were analyzed regarding supply security (dispatchable power due to hybridization with fossil fuel) and low CO2 emissions (due to integration of thermal energy storage). The power plants were modeled with different sizes of solar fields and different storage capacities and analyzed on an annual basis. The results were compared to each other and to a conventional fossil-fired combined cycle in terms of technical, economical, and ecological figures. The results of this study show that in comparison to a conventional fossil-fired combined cycle, the potential to reduce the CO2 emissions is high for solar-thermal power plants operated in base-load, especially with large solar fields and high storage capacities. However, for dispatchable power generation and supply security it is obvious that in any case a certain amount of additional fossil fuel is required. No analyzed solar-hybrid power plant shows at the same time advantages in terms of low CO2 emissions and low levelized electricity cost (LEC). While power plants with solar-hybrid combined cycle (SHCC® , Particle-Tower) show interesting LEC, the power plants with steam turbine (Salt-Tower, Parabolic Trough, CO2 -Tower) have low CO2 emissions.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figure 1

Analyzed solar-hybrid power plants (a) SHCC® Solar tower with solar-hybrid combined cycle and pressurized solid media thermal energy storage; (b) Salt-Tower Solar tower with steam turbine and molten salt as heat transfer medium and for thermal energy storage; (c) Parabolic Trough with steam turbine and with thermal oil as heat transfer medium and molten salt thermal energy storage; (d) CO2 -Tower Solar tower with steam turbine and pressurized gas receiver (CO2 ) and pressurized solid media thermal energy storage; (e) Particle-Tower Solar tower with solar-hybrid combined cycle and with solid media particles as heat transfer medium and for thermal energy storage; and (f) CC conventional fossil-fired combined cycle as reference plant

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Figure 2

Methodology for system simulation (a) work flow of simulation software and (b) operation mode and operational strategy

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Figure 3

Annual results for the solar-hybrid power plants (a) solar share in base-load operation; (b) solar share in midload operation; (c) specific CO2 emissions in base-load operation; (d) specific CO2 emissions in midload operation; (e) LEC and solar LEC in base-load operation; and (f) LEC and solar LEC in midload operation

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Figure 4

Break-even point for carbon trading cost (a) break-even point for base-load operation: SM3, 15h storage capacity, specific life cycle fuel cost 25 €/MWhth ; (b) break-even point for midload operation: SM3, 15h storage capacity, specific life cycle fuel cost 25 €/MWhth ; (c) break-even point for base-load operation: SM3, 15h storage capacity, specific life cycle fuel cost 50 €/MWhth ; and (d) break-even point for midload operation: SM3, 15h storage capacity, specific life cycle fuel cost 50 €/MWhth

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